Historic Ships of the Sea Maritime Museum Savannah Wedding

Oh, Savannah!  How I love thee.

Savannah is one of those places you can step back in time.  Where as soon as you close your car door the 21st Century fades away.  The literal stepping through Lewis’s wardrobe into Narnia.  Such is the allure of sultry Savannah.

If you listen closely you will hear the Siren call from the salty shores of the Atlantic beckoning sailors to sea as you stroll cobblestone roads lined with stately oaks dripping with moss.  Historic homes ranging from Cape Cods to the towering Federal Colonials with their blown glass panes stand side by side, surrounded by ornate iron gates and flickering lamp posts.

The sound of horses hooves clipping along mingle with the horns of passing cars and loudspeakers as a hearse ghost tour filled with tourists passes by.  Yes, this is Savannah.  The blending of old and the new.  Where dedication to preservation and romance is alive and sizzles through the air like electricity.

This is the place where visiting a haunted graveyard or sauntering through one of the many town squares is a normal date night.  You see this city has a heartbeat, pulsing with the souls of those long departed and of the living.  For lovers, young and old alike, it is a mecca of love.

 Adorn Collective Workshops selected the historic Ships of the Sea Maritime Museum as their host venue for their creative collaboration with local talent.  Their choice could not have been more perfect and true to southern life.

The Maritime Museum is located in the historic district and occupies the William Scarbrough House, a stately Early Republic built in 1818 by William Scarbrough the president of the Savannah Steamship Company.  This year marks the bicentennial of the Steamship Savannah’s historic Trans-Atlantic crossing.

Many vendors came together to create a fairytale garden wedding setting with its palette of white, sage green, and black.  Magnolias graced the arch ways and tables  filling the air with their sweet citrus-honey aroma.  Long dark, wooden trestle tables greeted guests with their beautiful crystal stemware and bone china amid the flickering glow of long ivory tapers seated in brass holders.

In a small private courtyard, a separate seating area welcomed those wishing a change of pace or a quiet moment to themselves.  An ivory period couch flanked by two arm chairs awaited those with bottles of bubbly and milk and cookies to snack upon.

The ceremony site faced the rear of the Scarbrough home with its elegant sweeping stone stairs and lined hedge rows.  White wooden chairs faced a beautiful arch adorned with lush greens, White Roses and Magnolias crated by the talented Moonlight Iris Floral based out of Charleston.

Angel wore a stunning ivory gown by BHLDN with intricate beaded bodice and sheer skirt.  Even the back of the gown was gorgeous with romantic detailing.  The Groom, the adorable Mr. G, wore a classic black tux with a period pocket watch and cuff links.

I hope you enjoy a sample of the images from this wonderful Savannah Wedding collaboration.  If you are looking for a historic venue that oozes charm and romance, stop into the Ships of the Seas Maritime Museum today!

XO,

Sue

Host: @adorncollectiveworkshops

Styling: @gandaweddings

Venue: @shipsofthesea

Floral Design: @moonlightiris_floral

Rentals: @eventworksrentals

Invitation: @kcreatives

Hair: @briannabadams

Makeup: @brookelancasterbeauty

Dress: @bhldn

Ring Box: @themrsbox

Vow Books: @weddingstorywritter

Bride/Model: @angelgrechanyyphoto

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

Suzanne Lytle Photography

 

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